I remember the very first day I met her. Wavy hair, jean-fit shirt, cool sneakers and lots of smile in her face. I liked her the moment we met. Those words we exchanged are still fresh in mine. I would call it a beautiful moment of mine. But, science would name it Episodic memory.

Very often, the little things we remember makes a whole lot of difference. My favourite tiny creature, Danio Rario (zebrafish) is smarter and brainier way beyond its genetic makeup. The tiny fish entrapped within the four walls in laboratories  and aquariums, broke the science of memory and cognitive function by its extraordinary brain assembly. This wonderful ability of them has gone largely unnoticed even by the researchers.

Memory is of two types: Episodic and Semantic

Episodic is an individual’s unique memory of a specific event, so it will be different from someone else’s recollection of the same experience. It is basically a memory of our autobiographical events that can be explicitly stated.

Semantic memory, is a more structured record of facts, meanings, concepts and knowledge about the external world that we acquired.

Episodic memory is the memory of personal associations.

So, this memory that is associated with the personal emotions, relevance and a rich inner experience which was initially thought to be hallmark character of higher organisms such as homo sapiens is found in zebrafish. Trevor Hamilton, who led the study now endorses this creature for memory and learning. The NOR (Novel Object recognition) test with a little personal associations like the wall colour, change in position of the object showed a promising result is zebrafish. It would be interesting to explore this area of science.

It is very true. Though we have lots of molecular tools to meddle with, if the organism showed no behavioural change, then it is of no significance. Hamilton stroked something harder in me. I have plans to study more on episodic like memory which is associated with making cognitive maps and retrieval of the very specific event with a novel assay Edward C. Tolman used to study latent learning and purposive behaviourism in zebrafish.

As I always say, Exploring a whole new world on your own is always amazing.

There are several reasons why this tiny creature is a craze for people like you and me to research upon. A kid up in the candy store asks for anything that is new and catches his attention, and in my case Zebra Fish looked a new on the game, and that caught my attention. The works and projects that I am interested to work upon have not yet been done on Zebra fish, and that excites me even more.

There is certainly no doubt that this tiny creature will provide major breakthroughs in the near future. The more I learn about it, the more we seem to have in common.

http://www.geneticengg.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Zebrafish-by-Novartis-AG-Creative-Commons.jpghttp://www.geneticengg.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Zebrafish-by-Novartis-AG-Creative-Commons-150x150.jpgSudharsan VaratharajanEvolutionary BiologyGeneticszebrafishepisodic memory,memory,NOR,zebrafishI remember the very first day I met her. Wavy hair, jean-fit shirt, cool sneakers and lots of smile in her face. I liked her the moment we met. Those words we exchanged are still fresh in mine. I would call it a beautiful moment of mine. But, science...When Nature and Science meet, Magic happens !